Thursday, June 21, 2018

52 Ancestors #25: Richard Enos (1693-1748): Of French Huguenot Descent

Ancestor: Richard Enos, six times great grandfather
Haplogroup: Unknown

Richard Enos was supposedly born in 1693 in Gloucester County, New Jersey. His parents are said to have been John Enno and Mary Dibble. John Enno was the son of Jacques "James" Henno, the first immigrant ancestor in the family. Several written histories indicate, Jacques Henno came to the colonies in 1648 and settled in Windsor, Connecticut. He was the great great great grandson of Collard Henno of Mons, whose presence at a reception of Burghers in Valenciennes, is given in the Registry of Burghers of that city on 7 February 1463.[1] The family history is quite interesting.

1600s map of Valenciennes; courtesy of Wikipedia

According to The Eno and Enos Family in America, by Douglas C. Richardson, "Collard Henno's great grandson, Jacques Hennot, was alderman in Valenciennes in 1560, 1561, and 1566 and Treize Homme in 1577. Jacques was a lieutenant of the guard formed by the Huguenot citizens of Valenciennes to resist the Spaniards who were attempting to capture the fortress city. Twice Jacques surrendered to the Spanish at Tournai, a town in Belgium just north of Valenciennes. In the 1560s he surrendered with Guy de Bres (a celebrated Huguenot preacher, executed at Tournai in 1567). The second time he surrendered, he was taken under guard toward Lille, France but escaped through the intervention of a band of Huguenot horsemen, after which the authorities lost all trace of him. He was pursued by order of Theodore Cresia, commandant of the Italian cavalry (under the Duke of Alva), who gave instructions to capture the body of Jacques Hennot wherever he might be found, promising an honorable sum to anyone who should deliver him dead, or a double amount if said Hennot should be delivered alive. The lands and goods of the said Jacques Hennot were ordered confiscated and he was branded an outlaw. Jacques escaped to England about 1598, and his name appears in the documents in the British Museum among the names of the refugees from the religious wars in Flanders."

Jacques' son was born in London, immigrated to Connecticut and was the father of John Enno. So the descendants of Collard Henno of Mons to the John Enno, who immigrated to Connecticut, seems well documented. What I question is whether John Enno and Mary Dibble were in fact the parents of Richard Enos. The only documentation that supports the relationship are several records on Ancestry.com from the Family Data Collection. These records were by-products of research into genetics and disease and were not sourced according to genealogical standards. I use them more as pointers to possible source documents about my family, but do not trust them without additional documentation. And as yet, I have not seriously researched the Enos line on my pedigree chart.

I have found two old genealogy books about the Enno family. They both include John Enno and Mary Dibble, but neither of them include Richard as issue:

Snippet of page 17 of The Eno Family: New York Branch. This page includes
four daughters but no sons as the children of John Enno and Mary Dibble;
courtesy of Internet Archive

It is possible there were more children as The Eno and Enos Family in America: Descendants of James Eno of Windsor, Connecticut, lists the four daughters mentioned above -- Mary, Martha, Anna, and Sarah -- but also a daughter named Susannah. This book goes on to say:

"...Apparently by 1694, John had ventured to Gloucester Co., N.J. for the Simsbury deeds show that on 8-27-1694, 'James Enno (weaver), of Windsor, as attorney for his Brother John Enno of the county of Gloucester and province of West Jersie, husbandman' deeded land in Simsbury to Christopher Roberts...No further record has been found of John so he may have died in New Jersey prior to 1697."

This snippet of information puts John Enno in Gloucester County, New Jersey, the year after the Family Data Collection record set indicates Richard Enos was born so it is entirely possible John Enno and Mary Dibble are the parents of Richard. I have not researched in Connecticut and Delaware previously and am in the process of learning how to go about it.

I do know and can document my descent from Richard Enos, who was my six times great grandfather, and for now that is good enough.

By the age of 15 Richard Enos migrated to New Castle County, Delaware. He married a woman named Susannah, whose maiden name is unknown, that same year and began buying land in the county. I have been able to collect five deeds which document the purchase or sale of land by Richard.

Richard Enos wrote his will on 30 April 1748 and it was proved on 3 December of that year. In it he names his children and, thankfully, for me, his son-in-law Robert Mitchell, my five times great grandfather.

Snippet of the first page of the last will and testament of Richard Enos;
courtesy of Ancestry.com

In the Name of God Amen, the thirtieth of April one thousand seven hundred and forty eight, I Richard Enos of the County of New Castle on Delaware and hundred of [illegible] same farmer, being old and frail but perfect mind and memory thanks be given to God for it therefore calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all man once to die do make and ordain this my last will and testament that is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into the hands of God who gave it and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in a Christian like and decent manner at the discretion of my executors nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall be given the same again by the mighty power of God, and as touching worldly estates wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me with in this life, I give, devise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form.

And first of all I allow all my lawful debts to be paid all of them of the whole. My dearly beloved wife Susannah, I give and bequeath to her the part of my estate as the law directs. Next to my son Abraham, I bequeath and order him one shilling. Next my daughter Mary I have five pounds of this currency. Next to my son Stephen fifteen pounds of the currency of this government and next to my son Joseph I bequeath and order him to have ten pounds of this currency and next I leave and bequeath to my son Samuel the one full half of my land and half of my marsh I now possess together with the whole of the brick house I now live in if the said house not to be divided all the same to Samuel. Next to James my son I leave and bequeath the other half of the land and marsh and all of my horses. The orchard to be equally divided with the rest of the land and marsh. And next I leave to Elizabeth Rebekah Hill one spring cow and calf.

And I do hereby utterly disavow, revoke and annul all and every other former testaments, wills, legacies and executors except of which I now name viz. Robert Mitchell, my son-in-law and Samuel Enos my own son whom I shall constitute, make and ordain to be my executors of this my last will and testament. Ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament. In witness whereof I hereunto set my hand and seal of the day and year above written. Signed, sealed, published, pronounced and declared by the said Richard Enos as his last will and testament in the presence of us the subscribers.

Richard Enos (sealed)

Before signing and sealing my daughter Mary is allowed five pounds current money in this my last will and testament which is [illegible] [illegible] twenty second line of same being forgotten by the writer.

Witnesses:

Henry Henderson
Will M. Ramsey
Cornelius McQuigen

New Castle

Henry Henderson, William Ramsey and Cornelius McQuigen being sworn do say that they were present and saw the testator Richard Enos sign and execute the above and acknowledged it to be his last will and testament being of perfect sound mind and memory and that they subscribed their names as evident to the same.

December 3rd 1748
Jehu Curtis [illegible]

A Word about Daughter, Mary (Enos) Mitchell

According to Early Church Records of New Castle County, Volume II, Richard and Susannah Enos' daughter Maria was baptized at age of nine weeks the Old Swedes Church. The church was construted in 1698 and can be toured today. It was built by Swedish settlers, who arrived aboard the Kalmar Nychel in 1638 and settled on the banks of the Christina River near modern-day Wilmington.

She and Robert Mitchell married in 1738 in Delaware and Mary was described by Rev. William Foote in his book, Sketches of Virginia, "was an eminently pious Presbyterian." She and her husband left the Delaware/Pennsylvania area by 1748 and migrated down what became known as the great wagon road through the Shenandoah Valley and settled in the frontier country of western Virginia within sight of the Peaks of Otter. Their land became part of present-day Bedford County in 1753. It is said she and her husband had 13 children who all lived to adulthood.

The death date of Mary (Enos) Mitchell is unknown but is thought to be around 1800.

This is my entry for Amy Johnson Crow's 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. The theme for this week was "Same Name," which I did not follow.

Using the Ancestral Reference Numbering System, Richard Enos, is Ancestor numbers 294 and 306 on my family tree:

294 and 306 Richard Enos was born in 1693 in Gloucester County, New Jersey. His parents are said to have been John Enos and Mary Dibble; died in 1748 in New Castle County, Delaware (will proved on 3 December 1748; married Susannah, whose maiden name is unknown in 1708 in New Castle County.

294.1 Abraham Enos, born after 1708 likely in New Castle County; died on an unknown date (mentioned in father's will).

294.2 Samuel Enos, born after 1708 likely in New Castle County; died about 1773, will proved on 28 July 1773 in New Castle County (mentioned in father's will).

294.3 Stephen Enos, born after 1708 likely in New Castle County; died on an unknown date (mentioned in father's will).

294.4 Joseph Enos, born 11 January 1714 in New Castle County; died 2 October 1717 in New Castle County.

294.5 Elizabeth Enos, born 30 March 1716 in New Castle County; died on an unknown date; married a Mr. Hill sometime before 1748.

147 and 153 Maria "Mary" Enos, baptized on 17 August 1718 at the age of nine weeks in New Castle County; died about 1800 in Bedford County, Virginia; married Robert "the Elder" Mitchell in 1736 in Delaware.

294.6 Susannah Enos, born 15 February 1721 in New Castle County; died on an unknown date.

294.7 Joseph Enos, born on an unknown date (but likely after 1717); died on an unknown date; married Hannah Vandegrift on an unknown date (mentioned in father's will).

_______________
[1] The Eno Family: New York Branch, page 7.

Sources:

American Genealogical-Biographical Index (database), Ancestry, Susannah Enos, 1690, Connecticut; citing Vol. 51, page 70 (accessed 13 Nov 2017).
American Genealogical-Biographical Index (database), Ancestry, Susannah Enos, 1699, Connecticut; citing Vol. 51, page 69 (accessed 13 Nov 2017).
Anonymous. The Eno Family: New York Branch, 1920, pages 7-17.
Calendar of Delaware Wills, New Castle County, 1682-1800 (images), Ancestry, Richard Enos, Farmer, 30 Apr 1748 (accessed 27 Nov 2017).
Delaware Baptisms, 1697-1886 (database and images), FamilySearch, Richard Enos in entry for Elisabeth Enos, 17 Jun 1716, from Baptism, Wilmington, New Castle Delaware, United States; reference ID Delaware Public Archives, Dover, and Papers of the Historical Society of Delaware, IX: The Records of Holy Trinity Old Swedes Church (Wilmington, DE: Historical Society of Delaware, 1890) (accessed 10 Mar 2018).
Delaware Baptisms, 1697-1886 (database and images), FamilySearch, Richard Enos in entry for Joseph Enos, 17 Jan 1714, from Baptism, Wilmington, New Castle, Delaware, United States; reference ID Delaware Public Archives, Dover, and Papers of the Historical Society of Delaware, IX: The Records of Holy Trinity Old Swedes Church, (Wilmington, DE: Historical Society of Delaware, 1890) (accessed 10 Mar 2018).
Delaware Baptisms, 1697-1886 (database and images), FamilySearch, Richard Enos in entry for Maria Enos, 17 Aug 1718, from Baptism, Wilmington, New Castle, Delware, United States; reference ID Delaware Public Archives, Dover, and Papers of the Historical Society of Delaware, IX: The Records of Holy Trinity Old Swedes Church, (Wilmington, DE: Historical Society of Delaware, 1890) (accessed 10 Mar 2018).
Delaware Baptisms, 1697-1886 (database and images), FamilySearch, Richard Enos in entry for Susanna Enos, 09 Apr 1721, from Baptism, Wilmington, New Castle, Delaware, United States; reference ID Delaware Public Archives, Dover, and Papers of the Historical Society of Delaware, IX: The Records of Holy Trinity Old Swedes Church, (Wilmington, DE: Historical Society of Delaware, 1890) (accessed 10 Mar 2018).
Delaware Births and Christenings, 1710-1896 (database), FamilySearch, Richard Enos in entry for Elisabeth Enos, 17 Jun 1716; citing FHL microfilm 6693 (accessed 10 Mar 2018)
Delaware Births and Christenings, 1719-1896 (database), FamilySearch, Richard Enos in entry for Joseph Enos, 17 Jan 1714; citing FHL microfilm 6693 (accessed 10 Feb 2018).
Delaware Births and Christenings, 1710-1896 (database), FamilySearch, Richard Enos in entry for Maria Enos, 17 Aug 1718; citing FHL microfilm 908217 (accessed 10 Feb 2018).
Delaware Births and Christenings, 1710-1896 (database), FamilySearch, Richard Enos in entry for Susanna Enos, 09 Apr 1721; citing FHL microfilm 6693 (accessed 10 Mar 2018).
Delaware Church Deaths, 1750-1886 (database and images), FamilySearch, Richard Enos in entry for Joseph Enos, 1717 (accessed 10 Mar 2018).
Delaware Land Records, 1677-1947 (database and images), Ancestry.com, Richard Enos, New Castle, 1710; citing Roll 001, pages 182-183 (accessed 27 Nov 2017).
Delaware Land Records, 1677-1947 (database and images), Ancestry.com, Richard Enos, New Castle, 1728; citing Roll 003, pages 46-47 (accessed 27 Nov 2017).
Delaware Land Records, 1677-1947 (database and images), Ancestry.com, Richard Enos, New Castle, 1739; citing Roll 004, pages 321-322 (accessed 27 Nov 2017). 
Delaware Land Records, 1677-1947 (database and images), Ancestry.com, Richard Enos, New Castle, 1742; citing Roll 004, pages 346-347 and 344-345 (accessed 27 Nov 2017).
Delaware Wills and Probate Records, 1676-1971 (database and images), Ancestry.com, Richard Enos, 30 Apr 1748, New Castle; citing Will Book G (1746-1751), pages 183-184 (accessed 2 Apr 2018).
Family Data Collection - Births (database), Ancestry.com, Richard Enos, 1693, Glouc, NJ (accessed 15 Sep 2017).
Family Data Collection - Deaths (database), Ancestry.com, Richard Enos, 1748, Wilmington, New Castle, DE (accessed 15 Sep 2017).
Family Data Collection - Individual Records (database), Ancestry.com, Richard Enos and Mrs. Susannah Enos, 1708, New Castle, DE (accessed 15 Sep 2017).
Family Data Collection - Marriages (database, Ancestry.com, Richard Enos, 1708, New Castle, DE (accessed 15 Sep 2017).
Foote, William Henry, Rev. Sketches of Virginia, (Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott & Co., 1856), pages 133-141.
Historical Society of Delaware (editor). The Records of Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church, Wilmington, Del., from 1697 to 1773, (Wilmington, DE: Delaware Printing Co., 1890) pages 219, 233, 244, and 265.
History, Old Swedes Foundation (accessed 2 June 2017).
Richardson, Douglas C. The Eno and Enos Family in America: Descendants of James Eno of Windsor, Connecticut, 1973, pages 1-2, 7-12.
Robert "the Elder" Mitchell (c1714-1799): A Devoted Presbyterian, Tangled Roots and Trees (accessed 2 Jun 2018).

Monday, June 18, 2018

Albert Einstein and the Charlie Fischer Orchestra

On 15 December 1930 the Red Star Line's SS Belganland left the port of New York bound for Havana, Cuba, the first stop in a four-and-a-half month world cruise. On board was Albert Einstein. Carl Kay, a member of the ship's orchestra, wrote a diary during the cruise. Reading it, I learned Einstein played with the orchestra during their Christmas Eve concert.

Carl described his interactions with Dr. Einstein:

"Thur., Dec 18th -- At sea...This afternoon Professor Einstein on the aft of our deck. So I hurried down to my cabin and got two cameras and then asked if he would pose for a picture. He consented, and I was quite thrilled with taking a snap and a few feet on the cine!"[1]

Photograph of Professor Albert Einstein taken by Carl Kay, fellow
passenger; courtesy of Internet Archive

Wednesday, Dec. 24th -- At sea...We rehearsed with Prof. Einstein this afternoon. At first the hour was set for four o'clock but his secretary came and told us that he was tired -- but would be there at 4:30. Then in about a half hour she came back again and asked to postpone the rehearsal until five. And so, promptly at five -- we were all set up in the Tea Garden -- in came Einstein, dressed as he always is in these warm climates -- tan coat, white trousers and funny old shoes. Never a hat on, no shirt or underwear and no sox!

Mr. Fischer[2] procured a violin for him and after a few minutes we listened to one of the world's greatest scientists doing a good job of playing the violin. The first number was "Berceuse" from Jocelyn and it sounded fine.

About then Mrs. Einstein and the secretary came in. They seemed quite pleased with it all.

Then Einstein wanted to play one of Beethoven's sonatas with the orchestra -- but he didn't know where his music was. Our American edition wouldn't do at all, so he sent his secretary out to find it. But she returned empty handed. Then Fritz went out to look for the pianist from the Belgian Orchestra to see if he knew where it was. And he too returned without it. Einstein, by this time was becoming irritated so he said (in German) that he'd go after it.

While he was gone, Mr. Fischer and Mrs. Einstein had quite a talk. She speaks English moderately well while the Prof. is practically helpless. She says he doesn't care to learn English because he can express himself so much better in German.

And in talking about the Christmas Eve program that we were working on -- she quite seriously told Mr. Fischer -- "But he will wear stockings on his feet tonight -- and a collar and a tie!"

Well Einstein himself returned without the missing sonata so we then played Handel's "Largo." Mrs. E. was very well pleased with this number and begged that it be included in the program. So this made three numbers that [were] sic used in the program -- "Adagio" from Beethoven's 5th sonata, with piano acc. Clem Moreau of the Belgian Orchestra; "Berceuse" by Godard acc. by our orchestra, and "Largo" with the orchestra.

We were all glad that Einstein asked to play with our orchestra, and I think he enjoyed it, too.

The Christmas Eve program commenced in the Reception Room at 9:00 with the orchestra playing "A Christmas Fantasie." Then a Christmas carol by the audience, more musical numbers, songs, etc.; a piano solo by Moreau -- the "2nd Hungarian Rhapsody" that was excellent...

Einstein played his numbers well and everyone applauded heartily. And sure enough he wore sox, shirt and tie and collar -- all dolled up for the occasion. But he had to sit down to play -- and all spradle legged!..."

_______________
[1] Cine = short for cinema, or moving picture film.
[2] The orchestra leader was Charles Leonard Fischer (1879-1948).